Philippines, Sports, television

Goodbye AKTV

After nearly two years on air, AKTV signs off for good. But problems within TV5’s sports division continue to persist today. (Logo courtesy of ABC Development Corporation)

On May 31, 2013, the AKTV on IBC 13 block aired for the last time. As reported over a month ago, Mediaquest has decided not to renew the blocktime contract with IBC 13, which expired in May. With AKTV ceasing to exist, Sports5‘s properties are being moved to AksyonTV and Hyper starting this month.

The AKTV programming block made its rousing debut in August 2011 with the Smart All-Star Ultimate Challenge, pitting the Gilas national team and an all-PBA selection against NBA players led by Kobe Bryant. In October, AKTV became the home of the PBA, airing all of its games for the next two years. Over the next few months, AKTV aired sports events like soccer’s United Football LeaguePremier League, La Liga and Bundesliga, the 2012 London Olympic Games, the NCAA, PBA D-League and professional boxing, among others. However, mounting costs, coupled with lack of profits, forced TV5 management not to renew its block-time agreement after two years.

The signs that AKTV’s days were numbered showed after the PBA allowed to air the recently concluded Commissioner’s Cup Final on TV5. In addition, IBC decided to reduce AKTV’s programming hours during the weekends. Originally the block aired for 12 hours on weekends, but was reduced to six hours in the block’s final few months. As AKTV was winding down, Mediaquest was scrambling to find a new network for its UFL and incoming NCAA coverage, which AksyonTV was able to oblige.

AksyonTV is no stranger to airing sports coverage. In its infancy, it aired a boxing match featuring Filipina Ana Julaton, but has since deferred from airing further sports in favor of news and public affairs. However, with AKTV no longer in the equation, AksyonTV had no other choice but to air the UFL, the PBA D-League and the upcoming NCAA season.

The demise of AKTV exposed TV5’s budgetary deficiencies. By committing too much on several sports properties without giving enough time to tinker and experiment, they lost so much money, and by the time the deal expired, they scrambled to get their sports properties on another channel. The 2012 London Olympics was a broadcasting failure, both in expenses and revenue. Also their more recent venture with the NCAA had an adverse effect on its budget. The ‘AKTV Center’ before PBA games, though well-viewed, was unnecessary. Perhaps the network’s owner Manny V. Pangilinan had a full pocket that he spent lavishly on it, without realizing how to conserve them. With all that in mind, it is clear that TV5 wants to be a cut above the rest, at par with competitors ABS-CBN and GMA 7. But instead their free-spending ways betrayed them in the end.

I already wrote about GMA 7’s lack of a sports division before. Perhaps GMA should step up already. Then again, neither will GMA 7’s ownership be serious enough to acquire the sports properties that TV5 has. Until then, TV5 should remain committed with what they have now, regardless of how their budget would play a role. Otherwise it will be a long season for the still-fledgling network.

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entertainment, music, news, Philippines, Sports, television, United States

Of Gays, Lesbians, and Homosexuality in Society

In an exclusive interview on ‘The Buzz’, Charice revealed that she was a lesbian. (Screenshot courtesy of ABS-CBN)

One of the most pressing issues in society today is homosexuality. Over the last few years strict regulations against gays and lesbians were being loosened, the most important aspect of which is to allow homosexual couples to marry. And recently lesbianism made headlines not only in the United States, but also in the Philippines.

In late April, NBA player Jason Collins announced via a Sports Illustrated article that he is gay, becoming the first active professional athlete to come out. But he was not the first athlete to come out. The likes of John Amaechi have also come out, albeit after retirement. Weeks after Collins’ statement, soccer player Robbie Rogers, who had come out several months earlier, joined Major League Soccer’s Los Angeles Galaxy, after which he became the first openly gay player to play in the professional level.

In entertainment, the most notable lesbian personality today is Ellen DeGeneres, who came out on the Oprah Winfrey Show in 1997. Other notable gay entertainers were Elton John, Ricky Martin, Drew Barrymore and Anderson Cooper. More recently Tammy Baldwin won a seat in the Senate, becoming the first openly gay elected senator, while erstwhile congressman Barry Frank married boyfriend Jim Ready, becoming the first sitting politician to marry a person of the same gender.

Yesterday Filipino viewers were treated to a long-awaited revelation by Charice. The one-time Ellen guest made her feelings known through this phrase: ‘Tomboy po ako!!’ (I’m a lesbian). In the months leading up to the announcement Charice showed up with a shorter hairstyle, tattoos and a manly appearance. She was even reported to have an affair with a female contestant on the X-Factor Philippines. Charice’s coming out statement was supported by many netizens through various social accounts.

Now that more and more people, celebrities included, are coming out at a high rate, is it now time to loosen the barrier between heterosexuality and homosexuality? I believe the time is now. There is nothing to fear about a person’s feelings or thoughts with regards to their sexuality. If their decision to come out is the safest and the best thing to do, so be it. No longer will the gay person be tolerated, he must enjoy equal rights that heterosexuals enjoy. Social acceptance of gays and lesbian need to be expanded.

In short, because of overwhelming support and sympathy received by these celebrities who come out, the best thing that people do is to welcome homosexuals as ‘one of them’. Their rights and habits need to be respected and admired, and they should feel safe with the rest.

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